Everyone Communicates, Few Connect: What the Most Effective People Do Differently

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  • ISBN13: 9780785214250
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

Product Description
The world’s most respected leadership expert gives five principles and five practices for breaking the invisible barrier to leadership and personal success. You have a good idea but can’t convince your peers of its merit. You crafted a groundbreaking strategy, but the team trudges on in the same old way. Certain people move forward in their career while you seem to be stuck. If this describes you or someone you know, the problem is not the quality of what y… More >>

Everyone Communicates, Few Connect: What the Most Effective People Do Differently

5 Comments For This Post

  1. David Ketter Says:

    John Maxwell is a popular writer. His insights on a wide variety of topics are worthwhile and helpful to read. And since he’s so engaging, it was easy to expect that with his new book Everyone Communicates, Few Connect. His work in many places has been credited with strong influence and helpfulness in the service of the Kingdom – which is part of why I found this book a bit of a letdown.

    This book is essentially meant for leadership communication. All leaders have to communicate but, Maxwell argues, they are only effective leaders when they can “connect.” The principles for connection are far from innovative or original, however.The only thing Everyone Communicates offers that a half-decent communications textbook would not is Maxwell’s own phrases, stories, and autobiographical anecdotes that make his case. This review may come across as harsh or biting in its critique, but as Christians, we have a tremendous resource to offer in the Scriptures and the leadership tradition of the prophets and apostles and these were neglected almost entirely by Maxwell. So, if you want a motivational-business handbook on communication, check it out. If you’re looking to make yourself a better Christian leader, this isn’t it.

    This review was done as a member of a blogging review team for Thomas Nelson Publishers.
    Rating: 2 / 5

  2. Terry Smith Says:

    It was so cool contributing to this great book about communicating well with others. I so much look forward to participating and contributing, it was a lot of fun and I learned a lot during this process. If you interact with human beings and want to do it well, this book is for you…Terry 🙂
    Rating: 5 / 5

  3. Steven Hopkins Says:

    I requested this book thinking it was going to be something alot more different than it was. At first glance this book appears to me to be a social media communication book, all the pictures on the front gave me the feel of a Facebook type book and I thought this was going to be John Maxwell’s way to help people connect on Social Media. Well to my surprise it wasn’t. Even though John Maxwell is a great communicator and all of his books are great leadership books to read I found this one very hard to get through. I struggled at times to even flip from page to page.

    A couple of things that did jump out as good take aways from the book was a quote from early in the book, ” It’s not enough just to work hard. It’s not enough to do a great job. To be successful, you need to learn how to really communicate with others.” This is a true for any job that you have, from a cashier @ the local coffee shop, to a high school math teacher to the CEO of a large Fortune 500 company. One other thing I took away and I will incorporate this ASAP into my life is his 3 S stragety:

    Keep it Simple

    Say it Slowly

    Have a Smile

    If you want to be someone you have to communicate and John Maxwell is one of our best communicator’s in the nation and we all can improve our communication. That being said I would encourage you to pick up a copy of this book and judge for yourself.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their […] book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 […] : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
    Rating: 2 / 5

  4. Stephen Barkley Says:

    Maxwell’s latest leadership book offers readers five principles and five practices to help them connect with the people they’re speaking with. At the end of each chapter, he takes time to apply the principle/practice to a one-on-one, small group, and public speaking setting.

    The most interesting idea behind book was his crowd-sourcing technique. He took a page out of the wiki world and posted each chapter online to grab blog comment data which he worked into the final manuscript. The people on the cover all contributed to the book. There’s also a comprehensive 4 page small-font list at the end.

    That’s where the interesting ends.

    If you’ve read a Maxwell book before, you know what to expect. Each page contains one or two pithy headings followed by a string of quotes that was sourced by his ghostwriter. Maxwell is proud of these quotes: “I love quotations. I believe, as British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli said, ‘The wisdom of the wise and the experiences of the ages may be preserved by quotations’.” Now I love a good quote (thus my series of Weekend Wisdom posts) but when your entire book based on strings of quotes, the knockout power of a good saying degenerates into a flurry of uneventful jabs.

    If you’ve never read a Maxwell book, give him a try. This is as good as any of them. If you’ve read him before, there’s nothing new here.

    “No one can connect with everybody. It doesn’t matter how hard you work at it. Though I strive to be an effective communicator, I know there are people I leave cold when I talk.” Too true.

    Disclaimer: I received this book for free as a member of Thomas Nelson’s Booksneeze program.
    Rating: 2 / 5

  5. Nyago Says:

    Less of a book and more of an aggregate of quotes, borrowed stories and self-congratulatory vignettes this collection reads easily, though in a rambling, disconnective way. There isn’t a format, such as 5 chapters each describing the solution he offers with real tips, instead it would seem Maxwell’s writer transcribes the general thoughts of Maxwell, attaches found quotes and randomly edits it into chapters. An audience that might enjoy this work would be a young Christian who likes an easy and quick read and hasn’t read much about self-improvement and would use this as a supplement to their own pastor. Any audience that has already read a lot of self-improvement may find this book too disjointed to glean much from, nor is there any solid pleasure in reading it as the writing suffers from being too conversational and simple (midway through the book Maxwell even stops to defend his way of being “simple” and says that’s actually its strength- which is true, for the right audience). That said, as I read the book on a plane, the man next to me raved about Maxwell’s work in general and how it had blessed him and made him a better person.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
    Rating: 2 / 5

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